Let Rhein Tech Help You With Your Next Project, Request A Quote Today! Get Started

MultiPoint Blog

An Insider Blog from Leaders on EMC & Radar Engineering


On August 20, 2015, the FCC released a notice stating that website maintenance and upgrades will begin September 2, 2015 at 6 pm EDT and the TCB and KDB websites will not be available. The maintenance is scheduled to be completed by 8 AM EDT Tuesday September 8, 2015. TCBs will not be able to issue grants, upload information, or access the electronic filing systems during this time period.  For more information see Public Notice DA 15-940

Please contact Rhein Tech Laboratories, Inc. for any questions and/or testing requirements. 703. 689. 0368 or email sales @ rheintech.com.

On June 26, 2105, China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology announced that electronic labelling of the SRRC CMIIT ID is now permited on RF devices, provided that it meets the following requirements:
  • The display cannot be removed and/or replaced.
  • Instructions are provided to the user on how to locate the CMIIT ID.
  • The user can locate the CMIIT ID easily and without the need for special operation required such as entering a password.
  • The user can locate the CMIIT ID without the need for special accessories or additional conditions such as inserting a SIM card.
  • The device meets all other related laws and regulations of China.  
  • In addition to the above, the CMIIT ID should also be affixed to the outer packaging and user manual of the device and manufacturers should ensure that the CMIIT ID cannot be changed or deleted by any third party.

Please contact Rhein Tech if you have any questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

The FCC recently announced an agreement with Canada to harmonise spectrum use along the US-Canada border in anticipation of the planned auction of frequencies in the 600 MHz band next year in the US. The Statement of Intent agreed with Industry Canada outlines a framework and timeline for repurposing TV spectrum for mobile broadband on both sides of the border. The agreement follows a decision on the Canadian government to allow mobile services in the 600 MHz band, using the same specifications as adopted by the FCC last year. Industry Canada and the FCC will jointly repack TV stations using the frequencies on the same timetable, freeing up spectrum for mobile services. The FCC said the agreement will significantly reduce potential interference for future mobile services along the border. The US reached a similar agreement with Mexico earlier this year.

Please contact Rhein Tech if you have any questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

 

On August 10, 2015, India's Department of Electronics and Information Technology (Deity) announced they are postponing the implementation date of the BIS Safety Approval Scheme requirement for the following products until December 1, 2015:

  • Power Adaptors for IT Equipment
  • Power Adaptors for Audio, Video, & similar electronic apparatus
  • UPS/Invertors of rating ≤5KVA
  • DC or AC supplied Electronic Controlgear for LED modules
  • Sealed secondary cells/batteries containing Alkaline or other non-acid electrolytes for use in portable applications
  • Fixed general purposes LED Luminaires

Please contact Rhein Tech if you have any questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

On May 14, 2015, in accordance with Ukrainian Government Decree No. 295, 802.11ac devices are officially allowed in Ukraine.  These devices must obtain National Commission for the State Regulation of Communications and Informatization (NKRZI) Type Approval prior to being sold on the market.   If a previously approved device has the 802.11ac function, its test report, certificate and RTTE DoC should be updated accordingly with NKRZI or the 802.11ac function must be disabled.  Please contact Rhein Tech if you have any additional questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

On August 5, 2015, the FCC adopted new rules to address the long-term needs of wireless microphone users by providing for continued access to the 600 MHz band and expanding access to other bands. Wireless microphones play an important role in enabling broadcasters and other video programming networks to cover breaking news and live sports events. Wireless microphones also enhance event productions in a variety of settings – including theaters and music venues, film studios, conventions, corporate events, houses of worship, and Internet webcasts. 

Most wireless microphones today operate on unused spectrum in the frequencies currently allocated for TV broadcasting. Wireless microphones also operate in other bands, both on a licensed and unlicensed basis, depending on the particular band. Following the incentive auction – with the repacking of the television band and the repurposing of current television spectrum for wireless services – there may be fewer frequencies in the television bands available for use by wireless microphone operations.

Specifically, the new rules:

  • Provide more opportunities for licensed use in the remaining TV bands by allowing greater use of the VHF channels and permitting co-channel operations inside DTV contours without coordination if TV signals fall below specified threshold;
  • Expand eligibility for licensed use of the 4-megahertz portion of the 600 MHz duplex gap to include all licensed users in the TV bands (broadcasters, cable programming networks, movie studios, and operators at major sporting/concerts/theater venues); and 
  • Provide new opportunities for these licensed wireless microphones to operate on a secondary basis in three additional spectrum bands, consistent with the FCC's spectrum management goals – (1) access to significantly more spectrum in the 900 MHz band; (2) access to a portion of the 1435-1525 MHz band at specified times and places, subject to coordination requirements that protect critical aeronautical mobile telemetry; and (3) access to portions of the 6875-7125 MHz band.

Together with the rules adopted by the FCC today regarding unlicensed use of the 600 MHz band these new rules provide for efficient sharing of these bands to accommodate various wireless microphone users, while continuing to protect the licensed users of each of the bands.  Please contact Rhein Tech directly if you have additional questions or testing requirements. 

On July 31, 2015, the FCC published 393764 D01 UWB FAQ v01(Ultra-Wide Band Device Frequenty Asked Questions); this document provides answers to the following UWB FAQs: 

  1. What constitutes the bandwidth of a UWB emission for devices operating under Part 15?
  2. How is the UWB emission bandwidth determined?
  3. What portion of the UWB emission spectrum is required to be within the authorized frequency bands? Is it adequate for just the center frequency to be within the authorized band?
  4. Can a device be certified under the UWB rules if its emission bandwidth resides outside of the frequency bands identified for each UWB application but all associated emissions are below the prescribed limits?
  5. How are the emissions limits to be applied in determining compliance of a UWB device?
  6. Is any specialized test equipment necessary for performing UWB compliance?
  7. What compliance information should be included with an application for certification?
  8. What type of measurement antenna should be used for performing radiated emissions measurements on UWB devices when assessing compliance to the UWB rules?
  9. Is there a provision for operating wireless tank level gauges (e.g., level-probing radar) under the UWB rules?
  10. Are there standard measurement procedures available for use in demonstrating compliance of a UWB device to the applicable FCC Rules?

Please contact Rhein Tech directly if you have additional questions or require testing & certification assistance. 703-689-0368

 

On July 21, 2015, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking seeking comment on several proposals to update and modify the rules governing the procedures Radiofrequency (“RF”) devices must satisfy prior to being marketed.  Comments will be due 30 days after Federal Register publication and reply comments 15 days later.

The communications industry and the “RF equipment ecosystem” has changed dramatically since the FCC’s last comprehensive review of its equipment authorization rules in 1998.  Recognizing that it is easier than ever to design, manufacture and bring new RF equipment to market, the FCC has attempted to respond to these trends by taking actions aimed at streamlining and simplifying the equipment authorization program.  In a recent blog post, we reported that new rules took effect in early July 2015 to expand the role of Telecommunications Certifications Bodies (“TCBs”) in the certification process.  In the current NPRM, the FCC issues proposals to further streamline equipment authorization procedures while being mindful of maintaining sufficient safeguards to ensure that these RF devices comply with FCC rules and do not cause harmful interference.

The NPRM includes several key proposals:

  • Unify the self-approval procedures. The Declaration of Conformity (“DoC”) and verification procedures are currently independent requirements for authorization.  The NPRM proposes to combine them into one self-approval program for all equipment currently subject to one of those two procedures.    The proposed new process, tentatively called a Suppliers Declaration of Conformity (“SDoC”), would eliminate the current obligation to use accredited laboratories but would clarify that all devices currently subject to the DoC or verification procedures must be tested.  The proposed process would incorporate some but not all elements of the SDoC processes used for Telephone Network Terminal Equipment under Part 68.
  • Update Certification Procedures. The FCC proposes updates to the certification requirements to respond to the trend of authorizing components, including modular transmitters, that will be used as part of more complex designs or in third-party host devices.  The proposals focus on the parties responsible for submitting applications.  The Commission proposes to amend the basic certification rules to allows for the certification of a group of related devices under a single FCC ID.  Additionally, the FCC proposes to relocate the rules for modular transmitters from Part 15 to Part 2 in light of the increasing use of modular transmitters in RF devices intended for operation within licensed radio services.  The NPRM also proposed changes to the software defined radio (“SDR”) rules to increase flexibility in certifying devices where the RF elements are controlled by software.
  • Updated Certification Modification Process.  The NPRM proposes to eliminate the current “electrically identical” framework for determining whether a device requires a new certification.  Instead, there would be two categories of changes, those that require a new FCC ID and those that do not.  The proposed rule changes would require an evaluation of the modifications, and potentially testing, to determine the change category.  Changes that do not substantially alter the overall function of the device will not require a new FCC ID, but in some cases may still require a new application for certification. Where a new FCC ID is required, due to substantial changes to design or layout, or replacement of components, a new certification would be a prerequisite.
  • Clarification of Responsible Party. The NPRM proposes to clarify who the responsible party is for obtaining certification in a number of scenarios, including when end products incorporate modular transmitters, third parties modify equipment , parties intend to market repaired or refurbished devices, and importers bring products into the U.S.
  • Streamlined Certification Application Requirements. The NPRM seeks comment on reducing the information that must be provided when applying for certification.  The FCC proposes to reduce duplicative information requirements as well as only require applicants to submit specific information based on the type of device to be certified.  The NPRM proposes to codify existing short-term confidentiality practices for certain types of information allowing for a standard 45 day period upon request and seeks comment on extending that period to 180 days.  Further, long-term confidentiality would be provided automatically for certain information categories (such as exhibits of schematics or operational descriptions) in all certification applications.
  • The E-LABEL ACT. The NPRM also seeks comment on a series of updates to the equipment labeling obligations to recognize and codify the requirements of the E-LABEL Act.  For example, the proposed rules will generally allow an RF device with an integrated electronic display to electronically display the labels required by the FCC rules.  However, even where devices have integrated displays, parties would still be required to place warning statements or other information on device packaging, within user manuals, or at the point of sale as otherwise required under FCC regulations.
  • Importation Requirements. The NPRM questions the usefulness of the information provided on the current FCC Form 740 declaration for imported devices, particularly since much of the information is already collected by the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol and may also be available on the internet.  The FCC seeks comment on the continued use of collecting Form 740 information.  The NPRM also proposes changes, among other things, to the number of imported devices permitted for demonstrations at trade shows and in other instances prior to satisfaction of the relevant equipment authorization procedure.

The proposed new rules and procedures have the potential to impact how RF devices are designed and/or manufactured and could have an immediate impact on devices that are currently in testing or that will be coming to market in the near term.  To alleviate these concerns, the NPRM seeks comment on a transition period.  The FCC anticipates that the proposed rules, if adopted, would be effective immediately but that responsible parties would be permitted to elect to continue to use the existing procedures for up to one year after the effective date of the rules. [View source.]

Please contact Rhein Tech Laboratories, Inc. for any questions and/or testing requirements. 703. 689. 0368 or email sales @ rheintech.com.

On  July 25, 2015, the following two documents were published in the Canada Gazette and went into effect:

      1. the frequency bands have been extended from 1710-1755 MHz and 2110-2155 MHz to 1710-1780 MHz and 2110-2180 MHz;
      2. the requirement for receiver standard spurious emissions has been removed, as it is incorporated in RSS-Gen;
      3. requirements have been added for the new extended frequency bands;
      4. the electronic serial number (ESN) has been phased out since 2008 and the international mobile subscriber identity (IMSI) information is now stored on the Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) card, which is not part of the device (Consequently, both ESN and IMSI requirements have been removed.); and
      5. the provision for cordless-mode telephone base stations has been removed.
      1. extension of the band edges from 1755 to 1780 MHz and 2155 to 2180 MHz;
      2. provisions for deployment of advanced antenna systems; and
      3. provisions for cross-border coordination with U.S. licensees in the band 1755-1780 MHz.
RSS-139 and SRSP-513 were published to include certification and licensing requirements for the recent extension to the AWS bands from 1755 MHz to 1780 MHz and from 2155 MHz to 2180 MHz.
Please contact Rhein Tech if you have any questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

 

On June 15, 2015, Vietnam's Ministry of Information and Communications (MIC) published Circular no. 14/2015/TT approving “National technical regulation for radio emission of wireless access equipment operating at Multiple-Gigabit data rates in the 60GHz band.  This new standard, QCVN88:2015/BTTTT(in accordance with EN 302 567 V1.2.1(2012-1)), will go into effect beginning January 1, 2016.

 Please contact Rhein Tech directly if you have additional questions or require testing & certification assistance. 703-689-0368

On July 21, 2015, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking seeking comment on several proposals to update and modify the rules governing the procedures Radiofrequency (“RF”) devices must satisfy prior to being marketed.  Comments will be due 30 days after Federal Register publication and reply comments 15 days later.

 

On  July 18, 2015, the following two documents were published in the Canada Gazette and went into effect:

  1. Requirements for ATC equipment operating in the bands 2000-2020 MHz and 2180-2200 MHz have been modified. These frequency bands are also referred to as AWS‑4 bands in Industry Canada's decision paper SLPB-008-14. The changes are the removal of the requirement for a dual‑mode handset (working with both satellite and terrestrial systems) and the possibility to use the band 2000-2020 MHz for ATC downlink.
  2. The requirement for MESs operating in the bands 2000-2020 MHz and 2180-2200 MHz to comply with emission limits to protect radionavigation‑satellite service has been withdrawn.
  3. The requirement for receiver standard spurious emissions has been removed, as it is incorporated in RSS‑Gen, General Requirements for Compliance of Radio Apparatus.

Both RSS-170 and SRSP-519 have been published to include certification and licensing requirements for Industry Canada's recent policy on ATC equipment operating in the bands 2000–2020 MHz and 2180–2200 MHz, known as the AWS‑4 bands.

Please contact Rhein Tech if you have any questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

 

On  July 18, 2015, the following document was published in the Canada Gazette and went into effect:

Radio Standards Specification RSS-310, Issue 4, Licence-Exempt Radio Apparatus: Category II Equipment, which sets out standard requirements for licence-exempt radio apparatus used for radiocommunication (other than broadcasting) that is exempt from certification.  Changes from Issue 3 are as follows:

    1. Section 3.2, Underground Radios, has been revised.
    2. Minor editorial modifications and corrections have been made throughout.

Please contact Rhein Tech if you have any questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

 

On June 26, 2015, the FCC published 388624 D02 Pre-Approval Guidance List v16, replacing the previous version 388624 D02 Permit But Ask List v15r03. This new revision addressed the changes to the new Pre-Approval Guidance procedure established in Report and Order FCC 14-208 and also added new items for Citizens Broadband Radio Service, LTE-U and massive MIMO. 

Please contact Rhein Tech directly if you have additional questions or require testing & certification assistance. 703-689-0368

 

On July 10, 2015, the European Commission published an updated list of standards in the Official Journal to be used for assessing compliance to the R TTE Directive.  (link)

Please contact Rhein Tech if you have additional questions or testing requirements. 703.689.0368

Page 1 of 35
Subscribe to Rhein Tech's Regulatory Update eNewsletter